What to do with leftover pumpkin – 6 Halloween pumpkin recipes

What to do with leftover pumpkin – 6 Halloween pumpkin recipes
23/10/2019 Anna Sjostrom Walton
Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. Simple pumpkin soup - There are so many variations on the classic pumpkin soup. So start with this super simple classic pumpkin soup recipe from Cafe Delights, with potatoes and broth, and go from there. You can then choose to add coconut milk, maple syrup, curry powder, chilli or herbs. Why not try toppings like creme fraiche or cream, toasted seeds, almonds, fresh coriander, pomegranate and more.  Photo: Ella Olsson on Unsplash

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick some Halloween pumpkin recipes (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg.

Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious Halloween pumpkin recipes like soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. Photo by Anita Austvika on Unsplash

Photo: Anita Austvika on Unsplash

Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities – this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don’t use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows.

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. This happens all in one go - as you slice pieces out of the pumpkin, put these aside in a dish ready to be cooked, or keep in the fridge for later. Photo: Nordwood Themes

Photo: Nordwood Themes on Unsplash

I’m particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties.

Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween’s over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife’s gone in. This happens all in one go – as you slice pieces out of the pumpkin, put these aside in a dish ready to be cooked, or keep in the fridge for later.

 

What to do with leftover Pumpkins or pumpkin flesh – 6 Halloween pumpkin recipes

  • Simple pumpkin soup – There are so many variations on the classic pumpkin soup. So start with this super simple classic pumpkin soup recipe from Cafe Delights, with potatoes and broth, and go from there. You can then choose to add coconut milk, maple syrup, curry powder, chilli or herbs. Why not try toppings like creme fraiche or cream, toasted seeds, almonds, fresh coriander, pomegranate and more.
Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. Simple pumpkin soup - There are so many variations on the classic pumpkin soup. So start with this super simple classic pumpkin soup recipe from Cafe Delights, with potatoes and broth, and go from there. You can then choose to add coconut milk, maple syrup, curry powder, chilli or herbs. Why not try toppings like creme fraiche or cream, toasted seeds, almonds, fresh coriander, pomegranate and more.  Photo: Ella Olsson on Unsplash

Pumpkin soup. Photo: Ella Olsson on Unsplash

 

  • Thai pumpkin soup – if you want a pumpkin soup that’s a little different, why not give it this Thai twist from BBC Good Food.

 

  • Pumpkin spiced chai latte – I’m always trying to find caffeine free drinks that can tempt me away from coffee, particularly when working from home. So Turmeric lattes and pumpkin drinks are a big hit for me. I really enjoy combining warming spices to create unique flavours. This pumpkin turmeric latte recipe on YouTube makes the step pretty straightforward. Simply combine pumpkin puree, turmeric, ginger, nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice, vanilla, raw honey and coconut milk. Follow this to make your own pumpkin puree. A golden milk pumpkin recipe that’s perfect for chilly autumn days!

 

  • Roasted pumpkin – simple but stunning, roasted pumpkin goes with pretty much anything. Set the oven to 180 centigrades, drizzle slices or chunks of any squash or pumpkin (with or without skin), add some maple syrup and fresh herbs (hardier herbs like rosemary or thyme are ideal) and roast until tender. These beauties can then be added to roast dinners, used to decorate the top of soups, and add flavour to stews. If you cut the pieces small enough and cook for longer, you can even add them to homemade granola.
Roasted pumpkin recipes - simple but stunning, roasted pumpkin goes with pretty much anything. Set the oven to 180 centigrades, drizzle slices or chunks of any squash or pumpkin (with or without skin), add some maple syrup and fresh herbs (hardier herbs like rosemary or thyme are ideal) and roast until tender. These beauties can then be added to roast dinners, used to decorate the top of soups, and add flavour to stews. If you cut the pieces small enough and cook for longer, you can even add them to homemade granola. Photo by Victoria Aleksandrova on Unsplash.

Roasted pumpkin. Photo by Victoria Aleksandrova on Unsplash.

  • Pumpkin pie with maple syrup, courtesy of Olive food magazine (1 hr 30 minutes, serves 8) – you can make your life easy and buy the pastry to make this creamy cinnamon infused pumpkin pie. Why not make pretty decorations for the top out fo leftover pastry? When we lived in Montreal, one of our favourite traditions was going out for pie before going to a concert or show. And of course the phenomenal autumn colours, with trees and pumpkins bursting orange, yellow and red from every corner. But this doesn’t need to be a memory just from North America!
Deliciously Ella's spiced pumpkin loaf - a healthy autumnal snack time treat! Made from pumpkin puree, oats and maple syrup.  Photo: Deliciously Ella via The Telegraph

Deliciously Ella’s Spiced Pumpkin Loaf. Photo: Deliciously Ella via The Telegraph

 

  • Pumpkin curry with prawns by Olive food magazine (1 hr plus marinating, serves 4) – Why should the kids have all the fun? Use the leftover craft materials (that is, the pumpkin flesh), to make an impressive looking and deliciously creamy pumpkin and prawn curry, topped with shallots and fresh coriander leaves. Coconut, turmeric, fenugreek and garam masala are all part of the magic.
What to do with leftover pumpkin? Halloween pumpkin recipe - Pumpkin pie with maple syrup, courtesy of Olive food magazine (1 hr 30 minutes, serves 8) - you can make your life easy and buy the pastry to make this creamy cinnamon infused pumpkin pie. Why not make pretty decorations for the top out fo leftover pastry? When we lived in Montreal, one of our favourite traditions was going out for pie before going to a concert or show. And of course the phenomenal autumn colours, with trees and pumpkins bursting orange, yellow and red from every corner. But this doesn't need to be a memory just from North America!  Photo by Olive Food Magazine

Pumpkin curry with prawns. Photo: Olive Food Magazine

Deliciously Ella's spiced pumpkin loaf - a healthy autumnal snack time treat! Made from pumpkin puree, oats and maple syrup.  Photo: Deliciously Ella via The Telegraph

Deliciously Ella’s Spiced Pumpkin Loaf. Photo: Deliciously Ella via The Telegraph

 

Natural Halloween decor

Of course pumpkins are beautiful in their own glory, without carving. Using toxic free paints can also produce a beautiful effect. Here are some ideas to get your natural Halloween decor creative juices flowing.

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. This happens all in one go - as you slice pieces out of the pumpkin, put these aside in a dish ready to be cooked, or keep in the fridge for later. Photo: Katya Austin on Unsplash

Photo: Katya Austin on Unsplash

Speckled Halloween pumkins. No need to decorate, they're a beautiful decoration as they are. Photo: Derick McKinney on Unsplash

Photo: Derick McKinney on Unsplash

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. This happens all in one go - as you slice pieces out of the pumpkin, put these aside in a dish ready to be cooked, or keep in the fridge for later. Photo: Monika Grabkowska

Photo: Monika Grabkowska on Unsplash

Are you wondering what to do with your leftover pumpkin this Halloween? Before you ditch the inside scoop, put the flesh to one side and pick a Halloween pumpkin recipe (or any pumpkin for that matter!). This is a great step to take as eco activism becomes more widespread, thanks to people like Greta Thunberg. Halloween pumpkins are beautiful, fun and delicious. But this year, more than 8 million pumpkins will be thrown out uneaten after Halloween festivities - this equals 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh! 60% of those buying fresh pumpkins don't use the flesh. So surely we should ask ourselves what to do with leftover pumpkin before sending this innocent produce to the gallows. I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourite is the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange, red, white and patterned varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. This happens all in one go - as you slice pieces out of the pumpkin, put these aside in a dish ready to be cooked, or keep in the fridge for later. Photo: Alfred Schrock

Photo: Alfred Schrock on Unsplash

Halloween pumpkin wreath with orange pumpkins, dark green leaves and red ivy berries. These pumpkins are un-carved and unpainted, so can be cooked and eaten afterwards. Photo by Joanna Kosinska on Unsplash.

Photo: Joanna Kosinska on Unsplash.

I'm particularly fond of combining different types as a seasonal display, surrounded by seasonally coloured foliage and natural textures. My favourites are the white pumpkin (seen here) and the blue pumpkin, which I place next to other bright orange and red varieties. Most of my pumpkins will remain un-carved as decorations, and as soon as Halloween's over, I turn them into delicious soups, stews, roasts and pies. The flesh from any carved pumpkins will be turned into lunch and dinner soon after the knife's gone in. Photo by @lovelyindeed

Photo: @lovelyindeed

Other things to do with leftover pumpkin:

  • Dry the seeds, toast them and use sprinkle them on your breakfast cereal. Or feed them to birds in your garden (unsalted).
  • Put them out for animals to snack on (make sure they don’t have paint on them)
  • Put the flesh in your compost. The high water content means it breaks down pretty quickly to give you new earth.

 

How to reduce waste

If you’re keen to reduce waste in other areas of your life, do have a look at the plastic free alternatives in the chalkandmoss.com shop. These also make thoughtful gifts. Here are some suggestions:

Recycled metal jewellery by Emma Aitchison, inspired by climate change, mountains and oceans:

Flow bangle Lava collection gold bracelet collection, inspired by lava and volcanoes. Hand carved in London.

Flow bangle Lava collection gold bracelet collection, inspired by lava and volcanoes.

Gold Necklace 18 Carat - Dormant pendant from the Lava collection. This everyday pendant is a smooth, touchable drop of lava. Made from recycled brass and 18ct gold plate, on a gold filled chain.

Dormant pendant necklace, Hand made in London using ethical recycled brass and 18 carat gold plate.

Handmade earrings - Vulcan - Lava collection. Made from recycled silver and 18 carat gold plate. Side view.

Vulcan gold earrings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cloth – a Nordic take on Japanese furoshiki cloth gift wrapping, made from organic cotton by Denmark’s The Organic Company:

This furoshiki wrapping cloth is Scandinavia's take on the Japanese furoshiki wrap; eco-friendly gift wrapping, without paper and plastic packaging. Instead, go for sustainable living by fabric wrapping Christmas or birthday gifts in this artist drawn cloth. The Organic Company's "The Cloth" is a gift by itself, and you can wrap a thoughtful sustainable gift inside. Or reuse for the next present season. The possibilities are endless. And with this organic cloth investment, be creative - buy this furoshiki wrap as a lightweight bag, scarf, baby wrapping and even as a simple and portable tablecloth, napkin or hand towel. Sensible, creative, resourceful and beautiful. Perfect for lovers of Scandi-Japanese fusion design. 90x90cm. The furoshiki wrap for sale on chalkandmoss.com is 100% GOTS certified organic cotton fabric. Japanese furoshiki wrapping, Scandinavian style! Drawing on Japanese gift wrapping without wasteful paper or plastic packaging. Display your love by fabric wrapped Christmas or birthday gifts in this artistically drawn cloth. You can also buy this furoshiki wrap as a versatile lightweight bag, scarf, baby wrapping and even as a simple and portable tablecloth, napkin or hand towel. Sensible, creative, resourceful and beautiful. Choose your design with artwork by Jasmine Watson, Lubich Studio, Mintstudio and Helle Vibeke Jensen. This design is Ann/Delicate. 90x90cm. The furoshiki wrap for sale here is 100% GOTS certified organic cotton fabric. This wonderful Danish square fabric is the Nordic take on the Japanese furoshiki wrap. The cloth wrapping is inspired by the Japanese way of wrapping presents without the need for wasteful paper and plastic packaging. Instead show your love by fabric wrapping Christmas or birthday gifts in this artist drawn cloth. And don't limit its use to furoshiki wrapping presents. Buy this furoshiki wrap as a versatile lightweight bag, scarf, baby wrapping and even as a simple and portable table cloth, napkin or hand towel. Sensible, creative, resourceful and beautiful. Choose your design with artwork by Jasmine Watson, Lubich Studio, Mintstudio and Helle Vibeke Jensen. 90x90cm. The furoshiki wrap for sale here is 100% GOTS certified organic cotton fabric.

The Organic Company‘s Food produce bags and All purpose bags, in organic cotton, to replace disposable bags and plastic storage boxes:

Food storage bag by Organic Company on Chalk & Moss. Available in white or green, and three sizes (small, medium, large) Food storage drawstring bag by Organic Company on Chalk & Moss. Keep your food away from plastic with this gauze woven bag in organic cotton. Available in white or green, and three sizes (small, medium, large)All purpose cotton drawstring bag available in clay, pale rose and black, size small, medium and large. Sustainably made by Denmark's The Organic Company, your gateway to zero waste living on chalkandmoss.com!

 

 

No live pumpkins were harmed in the making of this post 🙂

 

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